Category Archives: G1

Low Density of Compacted Specimens

“The density of my compacted specimens are low.  What causes this problem?” A Potential Solution Check the specimen diameter setting on your machine if you are using a Pine AFGC125X, AFG1, or an AFG2.    The AFGC125X can be set at 150 mm or 100 mm.  The AFG1 and the AFG2 allow for 150 mm, 100…

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G2 Error Code Guidance

“I was compacting a specimen with our AFG2 when the machine just stopped.  Upon investigation, I discovered an error code on the display.  What do I do now?” An Explanation The Pine AFG125X, AFG1, and AFG2 Gyratory Compactors all have error diagnostics programmed into the control software that help identify the root cause when a…

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Pine Recommends Line Conditioner

Pine recommends using a line conditioner with all 120 volt variants of the AFG1 and AFG2 gyratory compactors.  These include AFG1A, AFG1AS, AFG2A, and AFG2AS. What is a Line Conditioner? A line conditioner is an electrical device that automatically responds to limited over- and under-voltages that would otherwise adversely affect operation of your machine.  Approximately…

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Changing the Batteries in a G1

What kind of reminder or habit do you have for remembering to change the battery in your fire alarm?  Maybe you do it January 1st every year.  Maybe you put a reminder on your calendar.  However you do it, you realize the importance of having a good battery in place and you have developed some kind…

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G1 Floppy Drive Upgrade Kit

The 3.5” floppy drive was state-of-the-art data management technology when the G1 was developed in the mid 1990’s.  The 3.5” floppy drive allows a G1 user to save test data electronically.  It provides an electronic calibration data backup for cases of CPU failure or calibration blunders.  It affords a user the means to retrieve diagnostic…

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The Pine G1 Controls Upgrade Kit

Your Pine G1 Gyratory Compactor has served you well.  It’s been reliable.  When you needed it, it performed.  It’s been durable.  The oldest machines are approaching 20 years of service.  Your lab technicians know the machine well.  It’s feels like an old friend. But what just happened?  The machine went dead.  Your efforts to revive…

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